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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 24, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm... insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street were routine as pictures emerge of the prime minister with alcohol at an event during lockdown. he wasn't there saying, "this shouldn't be happening." he wasn't saying, "can everyone break up and go home? can everyone socially distance, can everyone put masks on?" no, he wasn't telling anybody that. he was grabbing a glass for himself. the prime minister's official spokesman says that borisjohnson takes revelations about what happened in downing street during lockdown "very seriously." a man has beenjailed for 2h years for the murder of three—year—old kemarni watson darby, who suffered more than 20 fractures to his ribs over weeks of beatings. the energy regulator ofgem says the price cap is expected to reach £2,800 this october — that's an increase of more than £800 on the current cap.
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the premier league approve a £4 billion takeover of chelsea football club by a consortium led by la dodgers co—owner todd boehly. manchester united and england... marcus rashford's debut book wins stock prizes. we'll be talking to the co—author at 8:45pm. good evening. welcome to bbc news. there are more questions for the government tonight over behaviour in downing street during covid lockdowns. for the first time, insiders who attended gatherings there have told the bbc that parties
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were routine — and they would arrive at work to find bins overflowing with empty bottles from the night before. they say staff sat on each other�*s laps at a leaving do in november 2020, where the prime minister has now been pictured, and that security guards were laughed at when they tried to stop one party from taking place. borisjohnson�*s spokesman says he takes the accusations "very seriously". the prime minister remains under pressure over his attendance at the leaving party a year—and—a—half ago, and the metropolitan police are facing calls to explain why he wasn't issued with a fine when at least one other person was. 0ur deputy political editor vicki young has the latest. unemployment is now down to its lowest level since 197a. boris johnson trying to focus on the positive as he opened this week's cabinet meeting. they have all been defending his behaviour during lockdown at a time when we were breaking was rife inside number ten.
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—— when rule breaking was right. there were bottles, empties, rubbish in the bin, but overflowing. 0r indeed sometimes left on the table. panorama has spoken to three insiders who attended gatherings inside downing street. police have issued more than 120 fines to those who partied here. this event took place in november 2020. at least one person was fined, mrjohnson wasn't. a staffer there described the do. their words were spoken by actors. there was about 30 people, if not more, in the room. everyone was stood shoulder—to—shoulder, with some people on each other�*s lapse. the prime minister will be disappointed. as you know, he's apologised for what happened. i think he's popped down there to raise a glass and say thank you to a long—term member of staff who was leaving and my view is that none of this should have happened. insiders say there were weekly invites to wine time friday
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in the press office at 4pm and several leaving parties. 0ne went on so late some people stayed the night. since december, mrjohnson has been forced to answer questions about what went on. i have been repeatedly assured since these allegations emerged that there was no party and that no rules were broken. you and your colleagues felt that you had essentially permission from boris johnson to have these events? that is what you are saying? yes, because he was there. he may havejust been popping through on the way to his flat because that's what would happen. he wasn't there saying "this shouldn't be happening." he wasn't saying, "can everyone break up and go home? can everyone socially distance,
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can everyone put masks on?" no, he wasn't telling anybody that, he was grabbing a glass for himself. a lot of these young members of staff from across downing street who have been fined feel they went to these events and they did not think they were breaking the rules at the time, because the prime minister was at them. some of the most senior civil servants in the country were at them, and were indeed organising some of them. and mrjohnson�*s response to the allegations caused disbelief according to one staffer. why is he denying this? when we have been with him this entire time we knew that the rules had been broken, we knew these parties happens. the police may have finished their investigation into partying here in downing street, but that is not the end of the matter. a senior civil servant is about to give a much fuller picture of what went on. this is about the behaviour of the prime minister and the country's top officials. it is about leadership and integrity in public life. mrjohnson says he takes the allegations very seriously. so far, he has been helped
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by cabinet ministers staying loyal, even though he has been fine. has a prime minister being honest about partying here in downing street? many conservative mps are waiting until they see sue gray's report before passing judgment. vicki young, bbc news, westminster. last week, the metropolitan police concluded its investigation into rule breaking, after issuing 126 fines including one for the prime minister for attending a birthday party injune 2020. now, as you heard, there are fresh questions over why he wasn't fined further. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has written to the acting metropolitan police commissioner to seek a "detailed explanation" of how decisions were made. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford explains. the prime minister, glass in hand, making a speech at the leaving party for his director of communications, lee kane. at least one person
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there has been fined, but the prime minister has not. the london mayor has written to the metropolitan police demanding an explanation. i think it is important when it comes to trust and confidence, when it comes to policing by consent, when it comes to questions being asked about the integrity of an investigation, that the police explain why they have reached the conclusions they have. but the met are wary of giving any further explanation. they think the more detail they give, the more it risks identifying people who have been issued with fines and that goes against the national guidelines for fixed penalty notices. last week, they said they looked at the circumstances behind each event, such as how many people were present, the actions of the individual, what reasonable excuse might they have for being there, and the legislation at that time. critically, they said that for each fixed
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penalty notice, they took great care to be sure that they had the necessary evidence to prosecute a trial were it not paid — so that was always at the back of their minds. so while most people were on lockdown, how was the prime minister not fined for attending a leaving party? it looks as if detectives who might have had to prove their case in court decided that a short leaving drink and speech for people who were at work anywhere was just about within the rules. but anyone who stayed on for a lengthy drinking session after the prime minister left risked getting fined. daniel sandford, bbc news. we can speak now to the retired detective superintendent at the met police, shabnam chaudhri, about the way her former force has gone about investigating partygate. thanks very much for talking to us this evening. i wonder what you made of how this process of fines and investigations was carried out, and whether you've had the chance to speak to any of your former colleagues about what they make of it? i
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colleagues about what they make of it? 4' colleagues about what they make of it? ~ �* , ., , colleagues about what they make of it? ~ _., colleagues about what they make of it? «w, , it? i think it's a very bizarre set of investigations, _ it? i think it's a very bizarre set of investigations, particularly i it? i think it's a very bizarre set. of investigations, particularly from the perspective that downing street were being and valiant democrat investigated for parties and the sue gray report had already recognised their failings, gray report had already recognised theirfailings, get gray report had already recognised their failings, get the metropolitan police decided they would send letters out to people with a list of questions. you made a point earlier on about the actions of individuals, for example, so let's just talk about that — it was a leaving drinks party, that much has been very clear and established. 0ne individual has been fined — it seems somewhat strange that all individuals present, including the prime minister, but it's totally irrelevant whether he was there for two minutes or five irrelevant whether he was there for two minutes orfive minutes, he would've known that it was a leaving do, and events party, there were drinks right in front of him, get he didn't come down to stop the party, but he made a speech. that in itself
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was a breach of the covid rules. and yes, i've spoken to several police officers for many weeks in respect to this, and they have raised their concerns in terms of how the leadership of the organisation has decided to investigate this. there are concerns that there are some political implications for senior leadership, that's why fines have not been dished out to more senior mps, including the prime minister. is it possible — we know the prime minister and chancellor received a fine, you can make a judgment as a police officer, right, the range of events that happened, the rules were broken, the one fine acts as a symbol of the fact that the rules are broken, and you need to itemize every single item separately, taking other events into consideration, if
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i can put it crudely like that. yes. i can put it crudely like that. yes, but the thing _ i can put it crudely like that. yes, but the thing is _ i can put it crudely like that. yes, but the thing is if _ i can put it crudely like that. yes, but the thing is if everyone - i can put it crudely like that. 133 but the thing is if everyone had been given a fixed penalty notice and they were unhappy with that because they felt they hadn't breached the covid rules, then they could have appealed through the process for the fixed penalty notice. at that option was actually taken away because the met police decided not to issue fines to many people that were actually at that party. it doesn't make because if you go to find one, you have to find them all. �* , ., ., you go to find one, you have to find them all. �* ,, . ,, them all. are you and your colleagues _ them all. are you and your colleagues - _ them all. are you and your colleagues - we _ them all. are you and your colleagues - we know - them all. are you and your. colleagues - we know about them all. are you and your- colleagues - we know about the colleagues — we know about the reputational damage to downing street, but there could as a result of this be reputational damage to the metropolitan police? fine of this be reputational damage to the metropolitan police?- of this be reputational damage to the metropolitan police? one of the bi est the metropolitan police? one of the biggest concerns _ the metropolitan police? one of the biggest concerns raised _ the metropolitan police? one of the biggest concerns raised to - the metropolitan police? one of the biggest concerns raised to me, - the metropolitan police? one of the biggest concerns raised to me, and| biggest concerns raised to me, and that i also feel is that trust and confidence has already been eroded, and this willjust eroded further.
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your bbc programme talked about downing street being the most famous front door in the country. new scotland yard is one of the most iconic buildings across uk. both of those have a lot of common — and thatis, those have a lot of common — and that is, should be built on integrity, trust and honesty. and many police officers now feel, as do members of the public, that they've been tricked and betrayed. because an investigation is taken place and now transpires a photograph has emerged, which the police already knew about it. those questions would have been asked of the prime minister and all the people present — and yet there were no further probes asked because of the fact that those interviews were not face—to—face and it would appear that the responses were accepted on face value and the decision was made that that was the end of it. so face value and the decision was made that that was the end of it. 50 in that that was the end of it. so in other words. _ that that was the end of it. so in
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other words, they _ that that was the end of it. so in other words, they took - that that was the end of it. so in other words, they took the - that that was the end of it. so in other words, they took the view that whatever people put in the questionnaires was correct, unless there is a glaring contradiction between one person's answer and another. can i pick up on one thing you said — as you understand it, and you said — as you understand it, and you weren't there so i appreciate you weren't there so i appreciate you reporting only what you were told, the officers had seen that photograph? 0ne told, the officers had seen that photograph? one of the newspapers said that as well, and i wanted to be clear about that. there's no suggestion in this photograph is changed everything, it was a known photograph during the course of the investigation as you understand it. it is my understanding that photograph was seen, that is not factual for me.— photograph was seen, that is not factual for me. one more question what we have _ factual for me. one more question what we have you, _ factual for me. one more question what we have you, i _ factual for me. one more question what we have you, i wonder- factual for me. one more question what we have you, i wonder what i factual for me. one more question i what we have you, i wonder what you make of the announcement from the chief constable of merseyside police, david thompson, that mandatory antiracism training is to be introduced to all officers in england and wales? it’s
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be introduced to all officers in england and wales? it's actually nothin: england and wales? it's actually nothing new- — england and wales? it's actually nothing new. mandatory- england and wales? it's actuallyj nothing new. mandatory training england and wales? it's actually - nothing new. mandatory training has been ongoing for many years, including diversity training within policing. i think the added caveat is that they want to raise awareness of history and culture of black and minority communities. if this is online mandatory training, then in my personal view, this isjust another tick box and won't actually fix the problem. the biggest problem here is the public and internal black and minority officers seeing that policing across the uk is institutionally racist. and chief officers have stopped short of accepting or acknowledging that institutional racism exists and is alive and kicking, and they use other language that will not be heard by the public or internal black and minority officers. until they acknowledge that, they won't be able to move forward with trust and confidence. . ~' , ., , able to move forward with trust and confidence. ., ~ , ., , . ., confidence. thank you very much for our confidence. thank you very much for your time. — confidence. thank you very much for your time. good _ confidence. thank you very much for your time, good to _ confidence. thank you very much for your time, good to speak—
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confidence. thank you very much for your time, good to speak to - your time, good to speak to you. think you. your time, good to speak to you. think you-— think you. statistics indicate confidence _ think you. statistics indicate confidence levels, _ think you. statistics indicate confidence levels, whereas i think you. statistics indicate i confidence levels, whereas the average is and 74% in the uk, confidence amongst police, within black communities, it is 10% down. something the police clearly need to address. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. the expectation is that the sue gray report could appear tomorrow. 0ur guestsjoining me are rosamund urwin, who's the media editor at the sunday times, and the deputy political editor for the independent, rob merrick. rob will take a very strong view on the front pages. i hope you will be with me. the government is denying claims the foreign office stood by as the former iranian hostage, nazanin zaghari ratcliffe, was forced to sign a false confession.
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it's after ms zaghari ratcliffe revealed a uk official was present when she signed the statement presented to her at the airport by iran's regime. the foreign office says the official only passed on iran's message that she wouldn't be allowed to leave the country without signing. the headlines on bbc news... insiders tell the bbc lockdown parties in downing street routine. pictures emerge of the prime minister with alcohol at an event in 2020. downing street says prime minister takes all allegations of rule breaking during lockdown very seriously. a man has beenjailed for 24 seriously. a man has beenjailed for 2h years for the murder of 2a years for the murder of three—year—old cream watson who suffered more than 20 factors to his ribs and weeks of beatings.
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pardon you while i blow my nose. how are you, mark? the premier league have confirmed that they've approved a deal for a consortium fronted by todd boehly to buy the club. the league says the consortium has passed its owner's and directors' test. the purchase remains subject to the government issuing the required sale licence. the club was put up for sale before owner roman abramovich was sanctioned for his alleged links to russian president vladimir putin following the invasion of ukraine. the government does not want abramovich to make any proceeds from the sale, but sources are optimistic about a deal being finalised tonight. the consortium is led by boehly but clearlake capital, a californian private equity firm, would own a majority of the shares in chelsea. west ham united defender kurt zouma has pleaded guilty to kicking and slapping his pet cat in a video that also showed him saying
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"i swear i'll kill it". zouma appeared in court in east london this morning. his younger brother yoan who filmed the video and plays for dagenham and redbridge also admitted one offence during the hearing. the animals are still being cared for by the rspca which brought the prosecution. 0ur sports correspondent natalie pirks was at england have called up west ham united forward jarrod bowen forjune's nations league matches against hungary, germany and italy. bowen's first cap is a reward for scoring 18 goals and providing 13 assists for west ham this season. the 25—year—old was in contention for the previous england squad in march but was ruled out by a fractured foot bone. there's also a first time call up for leicester city's james justin. the full squad is on the bbc sport website. england manager gareth southgate was also asked today for his thoughts on the recent fan disorder seen at football matches. there have been a number of pitch invasions after games in england in recent weeks with incidents of supporters attacking players. that included here at
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the etihad stadium on sunday when aston villa goalkeeper robin 0lsen was assaulted. southgate believes it speaks to a wider problem in society. we don't want to go back to fences up and the type of environment that created. the game has been more inclusive over the last 20 years and a better place for families and women to attend and a completely more diverse audience, so really positive. we don't want to step back, but football reflects society, so it'll be easy for some people just to put it onto football, but that's not the reality of it. i repeat, football has got a responsibility and we have to do our bit and we have to do that right. next to the french open, where there's been an emotional farewell for the home favourite and two—time wimbledon semi—finalist jo wilfred tsonga, who's retired from the sport at the age of 37 after losing in the opening round.
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tsonga, who said this would be last tournament, struggled with injury during the match and was beaten by norway's casper ruud in four sets. he was understandably overcome with emotion at the end as the crowd at roland garros applauded him. during his career, tsonga won 18 titles and reached the quarter finals or better at all four grand slams, including the final of the us open in 2008. world number two danil medvedev is through to round two. to cricket now — and warwickshire says there is "no timescale" on chris woakes' return from a knee injury. he is one of seven england fast bowlers that will miss the first test against new zealand next week through injury. woakes hasn't played since the final test against west indies in march. that's all the sport for now. back to you. i blow my nose, the tissues have been thrown away, lovely to speak to
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you. the energy bill for a typical household in great britain is likely to rise by £800 in october, the head of the energy watchdog 0fgem has told mps. he said he expects the energy price cap to increase to around £2800 in october. the cap sets a limit on the rates you pay for each unit of gas and electricity, and it currently stands atjust under £2,000. but if you use more than the average amount, you'll pay more. the regulator says 12 million households face fuel poverty. here's our business editor simonjack. beth, from bristol, and herfamily are like millions of others, seeing their bills spinning out of control and she is clear about the biggest problem of them all. energy has just skyrocketed, a big difference with that. over the summer we will be ok because we have just switch the energy totally off, the heating. it is this winter that will be the problem when the cap rises again and that is when we will struggle. and although expected,
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it was still shocking to hearjust how much worse things will get this winter. we are expecting the price cap in october in the region of £2,800. and how many households are already spending more than 10% of their income on energy. we have around 6.5 million customers roughly and as a result of what has happened in april. come october... if you accept all the caveats that i will not run through, it is around 12 million households. the government has already knocked £350 of most bills this year, but mps wanted to know what more they would do. both the prime minister and chancellor have said there is more to do and we have to just wait and see what is forthcoming. do you think bill payers are happy with that answer? just wait and see? no, we all know people are under huge stress. we also know the cost of living is a very real issue and nobody is suggesting that the government can pay the entirety
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of the energy bill. what we are committed to is giving support. the treasury has said it stands ready to do more to help struggling households, but it wanted to see the size of the problem before it decided on the size of the solution. now we know and there is renewed pressure on the government to deliver more support. industry officials told the bbc they are expecting something as soon as this week. the question remains will the solution include a windfall tax on the profits of the companies that have profited as household incomes have seen their biggest cost of living squeeze since the 1950s? oil and gas companies have reported record profits over the obvious targets, but the government is also considering taxing other electricity generators that do not use fossil fuel to produce energy that have also gained from higher prices. the threat of a raid on older and renewable projects and it drew warnings it could shake investor confidence in new green technology. the government does not like the idea of a windfall tax
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but the reality of the situation may yet force a u—turn. simon jack, bbc news. rishi sunak is to meet borisjohnson to discuss a financial aid rishi sunak is to meet boris johnson to discuss a financial aid— to discuss a financial aid package. chris mason _ to discuss a financial aid package. chris mason explains. _ to discuss a financial aid package. chris mason explains. you'll - to discuss a financial aid package. chris mason explains. you'll they| chris mason explains. you'll they are expecting a difficult day tomorrow with the likely publication ofthe tomorrow with the likely publication of the sue gray _ tomorrow with the likely publication of the sue gray report. _ tomorrow with the likely publication of the sue gray report. after - tomorrow with the likely publication of the sue gray report. after that, l of the sue gray report. after that, potentially as soon as thursday, an intervention or response to what we've seen today from the energy regulator. so the prime minister has been speaking to the senior economists with a range of views exploring the options as far as the government intervention is concerned. he'll meet rishi sunak pretty soon in the next couple days, and potentially as soon as thursday, politically convenient after all the headlines tomorrow, or certainly in the coming days, an announcement about what they might do. what could they do? there could be a bump up for benefits, a lump sum payment for
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families, and then there's discussions to be had about whether a broader range of households offered some support. in the medium term as the warm homes discount. the reality is any combination of these measures is likely to be way more expensive than the money generated by any windfall tax. i think there's a recognition from many that to do something that would be noticeable will be expensive. chris something that would be noticeable will be expensive.— will be expensive. chris mason, our olitical will be expensive. chris mason, our political editor. _ will be expensive. chris mason, our political editor. apologies _ will be expensive. chris mason, our political editor. apologies for - will be expensive. chris mason, our political editor. apologies for the i political editor. apologies for the sound, we've had some thunderous rain here the last few hours, chris got caught short there, at least he had an umbrella there. there's not much protection against energy prices. let's speak to helen bernard from thejoseph rowntree prices. let's speak to helen bernard from the joseph rowntree foundation. you look rather gloomy about what jonathan really had to say, but not entirely surprised, helen? absolutely. when we were looking at that impact this would have, once
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the new price cap comes in, low income families will have to spend a fifth of their inner democrat income just on energy costs. but for some families, it goes up to a quarter, and for single people on their incomes, it'll be hard for them just on energy costs. that is something we already seeing, a hardship it's shocking, and that's before the pricer is kicks in. i shocking, and that's before the pricer is kicks in.— pricer is kicks in. i suppose the wor in: pricer is kicks in. i suppose the worrying thing _ pricer is kicks in. i suppose the worrying thing about _ pricer is kicks in. i suppose the worrying thing about this, - pricer is kicks in. i suppose the worrying thing about this, like | pricer is kicks in. i suppose the i worrying thing about this, like the woman on channel 4 talking about how desperate she is getting, she found enough coins in the back of the sofa, i'm notjoking, to pay for cat food, but she was wearing how she would pay for her energy bills. very distressing to hear and not untypical. i there's another point on this about the economic knock on effect. if people are spending that big a proportion on their income, whether it's fixed or whatever it
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may be, they aren't spending that money on other things? and if they don't spend on other things, than other businesses suffer and you get caught in a very nasty cycle?- caught in a very nasty cycle? that's true, it is caught in a very nasty cycle? that's true. it is not _ caught in a very nasty cycle? that's true, it is notjust _ caught in a very nasty cycle? that's true, it is notjust energy _ caught in a very nasty cycle? that's true, it is notjust energy prices - true, it is notjust energy prices go true, it is notjust energy prices 9° up, true, it is notjust energy prices go up, food prices are through the roof. so what we are seeing as prices rise for the things which it's hardest to cut back on and most damaging to cut back on, but it means people haven't got the money for little extras. i think the other knock on benefits or things like people getting into debt. we were hearing from one person who started going to pawnbrokers to try get enough money. we are seeing citizens advice having record people coming to them for debt advice, and those debts stay with people, you can't pay them off immediately. the impacts on mental health and on children's development can last on years with the damage this kind of crisis does. irate years with the damage this kind of crisis does. ~ ., years with the damage this kind of crisis does-— crisis does. we are talking about not bein: crisis does. we are talking about not being able _ crisis does. we are talking about not being able to _ crisis does. we are talking about not being able to solve - crisis does. we are talking about not being able to solve these - not being able to solve these problems, doing our best to mitigate
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them, we are told the chancellor is meeting the prime minister to discuss some kind of financial aid package. from thejoseph rowntree trust, what have you been most useful at that? i mentioned it in passing, is off of the government hasn't thrown many of the problem, it just hasn't thrown many of the problem, itjust hasn't been targeted very well. money has been put out but it's not been targeted where it's needed. that's presumably something that you think should be addressed? that's right, the government has their own billions at it and completely failed to solve almost any of the problems. actually they haven't got much political credit for what they've done. the key thing is to get money into benefits as quickly as possible so they can raise universal credit very quickly to make sure it covers inflation, get one—off payments to people on the older benefits which less flexible. they should have done that
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before christmas at the string statement, they should've already done that. they can do it really quickly, then look at what the package for the autumn is, where you have this extra hike and more people suffering. i think the key thing is we've got an incredibly efficient benefit system, it's already done the hard lifting of identifying who needs help. they've all had to pass eligibility tests, so let's use that really efficient tool to get money to people that we know are suffering most. ., ~ to people that we know are suffering most. ., ,, , ., to people that we know are suffering most. . ~' , ., , to people that we know are suffering most. ., ,, , ., , . most. helen, thank you very much. thank you- — now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. we've seen plenty of showers today, some of them heavy, some hail and thunder mixed in, but also some good spells of sunshine. now, things are looking a little bit quieter as we push into this evening thanks to this brief ridge of high pressure, but another frontal system will arrive across western areas through the course of the night. so, here, it'll be turning wetter and windier, certainly after midnight. any of the showers further east fizzle out and we'll
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see some clear spells. so, a few chillier spots across the eastern side of the country under those clear skies, with the winds a little bit lighter. further west, milder, wetter and windier. so it'll be wet, windy, cloudy across northern and western areas to start wednesday. that band of rain will push its way eastwards, fizzling out as it does so, but it will leave a legacy of cloud across east anglia and the southeast. one or two spots of rain on it. but elsewhere, it brightens up for wednesday afternoon, sunshine and again some blustery showers. temperatures around the mid to high teens. and it will be windy for all. thursday, another rather cloudy day with further showers. but by friday, things look quiet as high pressure begins to build in. hello, this is bbc news with me, shaun ley. the headlines — insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street were routine as pictures emerge of the prime minister with alcohol at an event during lockdown. he wasn't there saying, "this shouldn't be happening."
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he wasn't saying, "can everyone break up and go home? can everyone socially distance, can everyone put masks on?" no, he wasn't telling anybody that. he was grabbing a glass for himself. the prime minister's official spokesman says that borisjohnson takes revelations about what happened in downing street during lockdown "very seriously." a man has beenjailed for 2h years for the murder of three—year—old kemarni watson darby, who suffered more than 20 fractures to his ribs over weeks of beatings. the energy regulator ofgem says the price cap is expected to reach £2800 this october. that's an increase of more than £800 on the current cap. more now on our top story at this hour. people who attended parties at downing street at a time when coronavirus restrictions were in force have described staff crowding together without facemasks and even sitting on one another�*s laps. insiders have told bbc�*s panorama programme they felt they had permission to join
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in because the prime minister and senior civil servants took part in some of the gatherings. boris johnson's spokesman borisjohnson's spokesman says he takes the accusations very seriously. the latest revelations come as the senior civil servant sue gray prepares to release her full report on lockdown parties in number 10 and whitehall. well, we can speak now to lord bob kerslake, who's a crossbench peer and former head of the civil service, about partygate and the sue gray report, which is expected to be published tomorrow. thank you very much for being with us. you have been out of whitehall now for a few years so it gives you a bit of perspective but you would know a lot of the people who have got themselves caught up in all of this, certainly the senior people. i wonder where it your hat as for head of the home civil service and effectively manage charge of staff, personnel and all the rest of it, what you make of this? i personnel and all the rest of it, what you make of this?- personnel and all the rest of it, what you make of this? i think we all thought we _ what you make of this? i think we all thought we would _ what you make of this? i think we all thought we would see - what you make of this? i think we all thought we would see what - what you make of this? i think we i all thought we would see what there was to see in that partygate but not
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to say this inset account on panorama was devastating. for me it was never about fines but the lack of leadership and standards that allow these parties to happen and then the attempt really to cover it up when challenged. and i think we can say now with absolute clarity that these parties did happen, that they were not about by senior people, i think both the prime minister and senior civil servants, and nothing was done about this. and i think we can also say that parliament was comprehensively misled as to the nature of the events and i think it's hard now to argue that this was not intentional. i think this is absolutely devastating and a damning programme that really changes in my view the whole debate.— that really changes in my view the whole debate. one of the things it seems to have _ whole debate. one of the things it seems to have flown _ whole debate. one of the things it seems to have flown from - whole debate. one of the things it seems to have flown from this - whole debate. one of the things it seems to have flown from this is l seems to have flown from this is perhaps there was a period after
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this early in the investigation for people found we are all in this together and we are all a bit and remised by this and all a bit embarrassed perhaps but we did and maybe we regret it and maybe we think with hindsight we did not think with hindsight we did not think but now we know we were wrong. and everyone was in the same boat with the process of fines and the effect of one of those it laura talk to anonymously from the programme says i got find, why were others in the room at the same time not find? that could actually now break open this. you can find people speaking out in a way that perhaps they would not have done and the path because some of them will find their names in the report when it's published. i think you are right on that point. i pick up a huge amount of anger and upset from thejunior pick up a huge amount of anger and upset from the junior staff, but eminently female staff, being singled out and senior staff have managed to escape sanctioned and i
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think many people went into the inquiry with a view that they would tell the story is a cell and then the net cost was of that is they are than the ones who were on the receiving end of the fines. others who do not cooperate in the same way seem to have a skate and i can absolutely understand a sense of absolutely understand a sense of absolute unfairness about that. we cannot let the junior staff suffer here and not take account of who ultimately is responsible here. it is the prime minister on the side of government, if you like, and the cabinet secretary must be challenged here as to what happened. and we have course await sue gray positive report of what we have seen so far i think is an estimation as to why we are now getting insider accounts and ljy are now getting insider accounts and by the way i don't think that's finished. i by the way i don't think that's finished. ., ., , ., finished. i want to put some in that takes us beyond _ finished. i want to put some in that takes us beyond the _ finished. i want to put some in that takes us beyond the partygate - takes us beyond the partygate question because much of this is
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focused on social gatherings smoke something one of the exhibitors said, she said we were in our own bubble and distancing did not happen and did not wearfacemasks. the implication of this was notjust wants people let their hair down they perhaps became cavalier about they perhaps became cavalier about the rules but that they did not observe the rules at all. so when a sense there is a sort of bigger question about how that culture could exist day—to—day. you are holding meetings discussing the consequences of covid—19 and what you are doing about it and getting vaccines and organising all of that, all very important and viable work people were doing it in an environment where they were not even obeying the rules that should have protected them and the people who they then went out to meet with kim a family they live with and all the rest of it from potential infection. it is quite extraordinary and it almost seems to be two parallel worlds here, the world the rest of us were living in, very tight
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lockdown, sacrifices in terms of our family, in terms of people who could go to funerals, meet their loved ones and all the rest of that, and then what seems to be a special set of rules only in number ten, i do not pick this up from any other part of government and indeed civil servants who were working in government at the time have expressed to me surprise that when they went to number ten, the rules were so lax. the observation of things like distancing and masks seem to be of a different level of strictness than they were operating in their own departments. and i think it'sjust pervaded in their own departments. and i think it's just pervaded the whole culture which is what this goes back to the people at the top. you cannot say this is all down to the ones, junior staff, say this is all down to the ones, juniorstaff, because say this is all down to the ones, junior staff, because it was a way of working, a way of behaving that seems to have been endemic in the way number ten operated. this a
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seems to have been endemic in the way number ten operated. as a second before head of — way number ten operated. as a second before head of the _ way number ten operated. as a second before head of the home _ way number ten operated. as a second before head of the home civil _ before head of the home civil service and the question now is how one takes into pieces because the report will come out, so people will be named and there will be those and i heard somebody say in the programme tonight when it was broadcast how can these people still be in theirjobs? there maybe people who said either that use himself to fall on their swords and one name mentioned is simon cases he is the kenneth or and are to be the most senior civil servant in the country and is caught up in this although i'm not aware he us would find is yet and perhaps we'll find out if that is a case or not. nonetheless he ultimately has to go. you may take the view he has to go whether others take that view is different. how do you kind of reset in number ten? there will be those are the prime minister he said he's already able to new chief of staff and this is all history in all gone and all over and we have moved on. what's our over and we have moved on. what's your view? — over and we have moved on. what's your view? 0ut _ over and we have moved on. what's your view? out of _ over and we have moved on. what's your view? out of the _ over and we have moved on. what's your view? out of the public - your view? out of the public at moved on and that if the key point. for government to work it must be trusted by the public. they need to
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feel that if they are being asked to do things everybody is doing it, including the prime minister and the senior civil servants. including the prime minister and the senior civilservants. i including the prime minister and the senior civil servants. i think of course it's going to bear some impact on senior civil servants, including sir simon case, but i think it will be very hard to understand how simon took the responsibility and fell on his sword and the same question was not then asked about the prime minister and in many ways these two roles are joint at the hip. you cannot disentangle one and say they are the ones they were responsible. it does not work that way. number ten if the prime minister's office and the prime minister's office and the prime minister's office and the prime minister's house ultimately he runs number ten. i prime minister's house ultimately he runs number ten.— runs number ten. i 'ust need to ask one other final— runs number ten. ijust need to ask one other final question _ runs number ten. ijust need to ask one other final question briefly, - one other final question briefly, there will be those who watch this and save he is not impartial on this because he did some training work for shadow ministers ahead of a general election on the labour side. what is your response to that? this
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is much more _ what is your response to that? in 3 is much more serious and whether i did it work for the labour side and i have to say i think this would not have happened under a different conservative prime minister. i think if teresa may have been the prime minister, i don't think we will be doing this interview in the way that we are now. it's not an issue of mere party but it's an issue of standards, behaviour and how we all feel that government should work. former head of the home civil service, thank you very much for your time. another 1a cases of monkeypox have been identified in the uk, bringing the total number confirmed here to 71. the mostly mild disease was first noticed outside parts of central and west africa, where it is endemic, in early may and has now spread to at least 19 countries. high risk close contacts are being trash and asked to self—isolate at home for at least 21 days.
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a man has beenjailed for at least 2a years after murdering his partner's three—year—old son and inflicting more than 20 fractures to his ribs over weeks of beatings. the court heard that nathaniel pope caused injuries to kemarni watson darby comparable to a car crash. kemarni's mother also received 11 years for causing or allowing his death. some viewers may find details in navtej johal�*s report distressing. this was kemarni watson darby, a three—year—old boy who was described in court as lively, boisterous and happy. injune 2018, he died while in the care of the people who should have been protecting him. his mother, alicia watson, and her partner, nathaniel pope. his ribs had been crushed and he died from severe abdominal injuries, which the court heard were comparable to a car crash orfall from height. doctors also found evidence on his body of a number of other serious injuries inflicted at his home in west bromwich that he had suffered in the days and weeks before. the evidence that was heard was something i've not seen before in my experience as a police officer. to hear about the descriptions of the injuries that
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kemarni suffered was really, really harrowing. pope has been given a life sentence for kemarni's murder with the minimum term of 2a years in prison. watson has been jailed for 11 years for causing, or allowing the death of her son. they have also both been found guilty of child cruelty charges. thejudge here at birmingham crown court said this had been a particularly distressing and tragic case. kemarni's relatives let out a small cheer as the life term was read out and one of them told me that she feltjustice had been served for the little boy whose death has devastated his family. navteonhal, bbc news, birmingham. a huge collection of data, including these photographs which are linked to china's treatment of uyghurs and other minorities, has been handed to the bbc. they shed more light on china's highly secretive system of mass incarceration of uyghur people
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in the country's xinjiang region. the information was hacked from police computer servers, and it includes evidence of a shoot—to—kill policy for anyone who tried to escape. the foreign secretary, liz truss, has called the revelations shocking. here's our correspondent john sudworth. camera shutter click. these are the faces china never intended us to see from inside its system of mass incarceration in xinjiang. the government has long denied it is running detention camps for uighurs, insisting instead they are vocational schools for willing students. the photos, almost 3000 of them, show the reality of how whole swathes of uyghur society have been swept up person by person. the oldest was 73 at the time of her detention, the youngest just 15.
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the uyghurs, with their turkic language, islamic traditions and roots in a region with a history of separatism and violence, have long faced cycles of tightening government control. singing. and with mounting criticism over the camps, the authorities have taken journalists on tours, showing them uyghurs celebrating their culture and, they say, being guided away from extremism. but it's a narrative undermined by the tens of thousands of files passed to the bbc. one set of documents described the guarding of this camp just outside the city of kashgar with armed police stationed at all the main buildings and with each watchtower guarded by two officers equipped with sniper rifles and machine guns. inside, lessons are watched over by police carrying shields, batons and handcuffs. and the documents describe the response to students who attempt to escape.
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if warning shots are ignored the order is clear — shoot them dead. yes, this is classified, internal government information. the file, said to have been hacked from police computer servers in xinjiang by a source whose identity remains unknown, were first passed to dr adrian zamis, a xinjiang scholar, who in turn shared them with the bbc. you have police officers in heavy riot gear standing next to the men. some of the men have their arms in a funny position as if they were handcuffed, so this is really very powerful image material. i was looking through these images on my laptop in the living room, and i had to get up and go somewhere else and take a break. i was overwhelmed. the hacked files also contain hundreds of spreadsheets, row upon row of draconian jail sentences often targeting expressions of islamic faith as a parallel method alongside the camps for detaining uyghurs en masse.
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just for growing a beard, this person was sentenced to 16 years injail, his chosen expression of uyghur identity forcibly removed. many others have been jailed for listening to "illegal religious lectures", including this couple. the documents don't say whether their daughters have been sent, like so many others, to the state—run boarding schools built alongside the camps. the data can be verified, shown to contain real people. abdulrahman hassan has not seen his wife and children since he left xinjiang in 2017, yet a search of the hacked files found this. oh, god. a photo of his wife, sentenced, the documents say, to 16 years in prison for a vague offence that appears time and again — gathering a crowd to disturb the social order.
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"you can see how her spirit is broken," he tells me. mahmood toti knew his eldest son had beenjailed, but the database tells him for how long. 15 years for terrorism offences, although as evidence only his son's devout islamic faith is listed. the chinese foreign ministry spokesman responded to our reporter, describing it as simply the latest anti—china falsehoods and an attempt to smear china with rumours and lies. "xinjiang is stable, prosperous and the people live happy lives," he said. but there's been no attempt to address the evidence itself, which includes these images from deep within the system, further evidence of the harsh detention and indoctrination of a people not for what they've done, but for who they are. john sudworth, bbc news.
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bricking use from the rmt unit which is been battling its workers on the rail conditions and in particular eight 2000 jobs at network rail in terms of those involved in maintenance at network rail but also the dispute also involves pay and conditions for staff at rail operating companies as well, in other words drivers and other railway staff. they have voted according to the rmt overwhelmingly though it does not give figures in favour of strike action across network rail and the train operating companies like gw are in southwestern and someone, that strike action, there is some discussion he could blink —— begin overjubilee week it was about eight to give notice once they have validated and have got a balance in favour, a mandate for in law under the legislation, they i think right
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in striking is only valid for up to six months, that's maximum from any ballot. so they have a six month window but they also had to give a minimum period of notice to the employers they are taking strike action and therefore that will include, issuing a press release in fact i can give you a bit more on it, the timetable for says the national executive committee of the rmt will not meet to discuss a timetable for strike action in that action will begin in mid june. the jubilee is safe as far as any strike action so if you're planning to take the trade to see family or friends in the, you have to go to an event and the use of train, no or you can still do that but obviously serious applications for this is somebody pointing out that the average train that does right in this country, one of the papers reported this week,
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takes 72 lloris worth of goods on the average train to the priority for network rail is going to be keeping freight trains coming and there are suggestions that passenger services may have to suffer as a result also let me quote for you as i do actually give the figures and i apologise to the rmt but they do have other news release, 71% of those bounded to part in the vote, so three quarters turned out were just under an 89% of that 71% to most of the vast majority voting in favour of strike action and 11% voted against and the unit will now after talks with network rail on the 15th train operating companies with in the meantime the unit will be asking for a green mid june and we sincerely hope the ministers will occur employers to return to the negotiating table and hammer out a reasonable settlement with the rmt. the dispute is over pay, jobs and safety, they say. now, the footballer marcus rashford
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has already made a difference to the next generation. the manchester united and england striker has been an outspoken campaigner on food poverty, forcing the government into a u—turn on the provision of school meals during the holidays. well, now, this kids' book, co—written by marcus rachford, has won top prize at the british book awards. it's a self—help book aimed at secondary school children. we can speak to the co—author of you are a champion, sports journalist carl anka, whojoins me from manchester. congratulations! thank you very much. congratulations! thank you very much- were _ congratulations! thank you very much. were you _ congratulations! thank you very much. were you surprised? - congratulations! thank you very | much. were you surprised? very congratulations! thank you very - much. were you surprised? very much so. it's much. were you surprised? very much so- it's not _ much. were you surprised? very much so- it's not a — much. were you surprised? very much so. it's not a bad _ much. were you surprised? very much so. it's not a bad result _ much. were you surprised? very much so. it's not a bad result for _ much. were you surprised? very much so. it's not a bad result for two - so. it's not a bad result for two co—writers working on their first ever book. i'm deeply grateful and very humbled by the reception it's gotten.
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very humbled by the reception it's rotten. ~ ., ., i. very humbled by the reception it's rotten. ~ ., ., ,, ~' very humbled by the reception it's rotten. ~ ., ., ~ , very humbled by the reception it's rotten.~ ., ., ~ ,,, gotten. what do you think is special about the book? _ gotten. what do you think is special about the book? saving _ gotten. what do you think is special about the book? saving your - gotten. what do you think is special about the book? saving your own i about the book? saving your own modesty, what do you think makes it stand out? i modesty, what do you think makes it stand out? ~ �* , modesty, what do you think makes it stand out? ~' �* , ., . ., , stand out? i think there's a clarity to marcus rashford _ stand out? i think there's a clarity to marcus rashford and _ stand out? i think there's a clarity to marcus rashford and the - stand out? i think there's a clarity to marcus rashford and the way l stand out? i think there's a clarityl to marcus rashford and the way he goes about thinking of things. he's got an incredible talent for lateral thinking and he's got an amazing way to have the longest view in the room, the longest vision. and this book, every time we sat down to have conversations about how to put the book together, i ask him what he want to write a children's booking up want to write a children's booking up and said he wanted to help create something that provides you with optimism and allow children to understand that regardless of their background, where that come from, that they are allowed to dream and they are allowed to go and act on those dreams and there are no limits whatsoever on what they're capable
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of. , , . , ., whatsoever on what they're capable of. , , ., , ., whatsoever on what they're capable of. , ., , ., ., of. give us a bit of insight to how this collaboration _ of. give us a bit of insight to how this collaboration works. you're i this collaboration works. you're both in manchester which is helpful so did you effectively interview him and try and turn it into something or did he write stuff and you kind of almost check it and say you cannot read it like that, can i suggest this? how did it work? i describe a little bit as real as a relationship between an architect and a builder. so a bit like making and a builder. so a bit like making a gin and tonic, shall we say? sometimes on the janet sometimes on the tonto but will very often happened was we would have conversations and markets, the book came together in about three or four months last year during lockdown, and we met over resume and whatnot and we met over resume and whatnot and i would ask him a series of questions much like in an interview, so your earliest memory and time on yourfriendship group so your earliest memory and time on your friendship group looked after your friendship group looked after you and tell me your one thing at
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school that really scares you and out asking those questions and he always was generous with his time was of so scheduled would talk for an hour, it will be 90 minutes and maybe two hours and talk about everything. and then once those interviews were complete, i essentially use the system that involves several marked pens, a big spreadsheet and he talked about certain times like his mother, i will get a certain colour code and his school, that get a different colour code and you not to get a different colour code and then i as we were working together on the book, certain subjects came up more than once, colour codes going with certain chapter and then it was a case of shaping and refining things. it sounds like you, as you say, gave it shape and i guess he saw and you because you were chosen for this having pitched after your agent anderson said he looks for a co—author and you have pitched others and others pitched and he
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must�*ve seen something in you that he knew what kind of work with his personality and that you had a similar sort of empathy for what he was trying to do. i similar sort of empathy for what he was trying to do— was trying to do. i hope so. i never uuite set was trying to do. i hope so. i never quite set out _ was trying to do. i hope so. i never quite set out and _ was trying to do. i hope so. i never quite set out and asked _ was trying to do. i hope so. i never quite set out and asked him - was trying to do. i hope so. i never quite set out and asked him why i was trying to do. i hope so. i never| quite set out and asked him why he chose me. we put the book together in a few months and whatnot and i think collaborating with him was the best of my life. i only had a disagreement over two things, one is because i was more in london and he was in manchester so we had a different opinion on what we call the neighbourhood. i called and neighbourhood and he called an area and the other one was not so much disagreement but i was fascinated by a story he told me about when he used to go to play football and park at his brother if anyone came up, he was not allowed to play and had to go stand on the side of a kiss he was not allow any children that might rip them up and come up and he said it must�*ve been hard at six or seven years of age watching everyone play football and you stand on the
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sideline. he said it was hard but that's when he learned how to practice and keeping up his own technique and asset as a younger sibling did you everfeel a moment where you might want to ask your mum can you get a pair of football boots? and he said no because he knew that his older brother did not get a pair of boots until ten or 13 so he had to wait until that age and ifound that very so he had to wait until that age and i found that very interesting. i was almost incredulous. there is no way i initially would have that much patience and he said of course i did commit so much i love my mum and how much i thought about everything. i think at a moment where i said i'm sorry if i make a laughing noise is not because i don't believe he is just because i think that's a remarkable amount of pages and with it have is at an early age and he said he will be really good if we can help bring that sort of lesson to the next generation of being kind and having great into the for one another and remaining curious at all times. i another and remaining curious at all times. ~ , ., .,
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times. i think you deliver what should be _ times. i think you deliver what should be the _ times. i think you deliver what should be the last _ times. i think you deliver what should be the last word - times. i think you deliver what should be the last word on - times. i think you deliver what| should be the last word on this commitment is to remind her of the name of the book you are a champion, here it is, the british book award best book of the year, quite right and carl anka marcus rashford, thank you very much for talking to us and hold the award up again to just leave it up for a few seconds will be can get a good view of you with it. and when people can grab a screen grab of that as well. thank you so much in real pleasure to speak to you and pass an arc congratulations to marcus as well if you want and we look forward to the sequel. thank you so much. let me re—break the bad news that is from the commuter point of view and everyone else uses the trains and freight as well that rmt has a valid and successfully for strike action and successfully for strike action and they said they don't want to strike and they want management to come and sit down and talk but the vote was 71% of those taking part and of that internet percent voted in favour of action and 11% against. the secretary says strike to begin
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in early to mid june and that is to meet the terms of the legal requirement to give notice to employers but that he hopes that the ministers will pressure the employers to return to negotiating table and hammer out a reasonable settlement with the rmt. that you very much for your company and never get the papers and from pages at 10:30pm at 11:30pm and now time for the weather. hello there. we saw plenty of showers today, some of them more heavy with hail and thunder, particularly across parts of england and wales. now, things are looking a little bit quieter as we push into this evening thanks to this brief ridge of high pressure, but another frontal system will arrive across western areas through the course of the night. so, here, it'll be turning wetter and windier, certainly after midnight. any of the showers further east fizzle out and we'll see some clear spells. so, a few chillier spots across the eastern side of the country under those clear skies, with the winds a little bit lighter. further west, milder, wetter and windier. so it'll be wet, windy, cloudy across northern and western areas to start wednesday. that band of rain will push its way eastwards,
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fizzling out as it does so, but it will leave a legacy of cloud across east anglia and the southeast. one or two spots of rain on it. but elsewhere, it brightens up for wednesday afternoon, sunshine and again some blustery showers. temperatures around the mid to high teens. and it will be windy for all. thursday, another rather cloudy day with further showers. but by friday, things look quiet as high pressure begins to build in.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. a culture set at the top — downing street insiders describe parties during lockdown that went all night. bins full of empty bottles, staff sitting on each other�*s laps. and they did it because they believed they had mrjohnson's "implicit permission". he wasn't there saying, "this shouldn't be happening." he wasn't saying, "can everyone break up and go home? 40% of british households could soon be in fuel poverty — britain's energy regulator says bills willjump by another £800 in october, with further rises possible in 2023. hacked police files reveal the details of thousands of uyghurs detained in xinjiang — the oldest in detention is 73, the youngest, just 15.

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